3 reasons why Tennessee is seeing lower COVID-19 death rates than other states – WKRN News 2

” In Georgia, they have actually had about 29 deaths per hundred thousand Georgians. Whereas in Tennessee, weve just had about 11 and a half deaths per hundred thousand Tennesseans up until now,” said Buntin.

That death toll is a fraction of the number other states are experiencing. For instance, Georgia has seen more than 3,104.

” Here in Tennessee we did see a great deal of cases among youths, those aged 20-35 throughout June. And, they were a few of the biggest groups getting contaminated,” Buntin described.

Stay with News 2 for continuing protection of the COVID-19 Pandemic.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN)– As state health officials launch daily COVID-19 numbers, information demonstrates how Tennessee accumulates to other states in the increase of deaths and cases.

” Over time, we are lucky that we are improving at dealing with COVID patients,” stated Buntin. “The medical practices have altered therefore we might have lower death rates even among those ill sufficient to be hospitalized.”

” We have been fortunate that we werent on the early edge of this pandemic, but with our hospitalization rates rising the way we have seen over the past couple of weeks, Im sorry to say deaths are most likely coming too.”

She also states the timing of the infection making its way to Tennessee and advancement in treatment has actually helped to keep death numbers down.

While number in deaths are slowly rising, Buntin says there are more to come.

Buntin says there are 3 possible reasons for the plain difference in Tennessee deaths.

As of Thursday, Tennessee had 2,749 new cases and 13 new deaths in a 24-hour duration. So far, 796 people have actually died because of coronavirus in the state of Tennessee.

” Certainly while we are seeing those numbers every day, we understand that each of those numbers is a genuine person,” said Dr. Melinda Buntin, chair of the Department of Health Policy at Vanderbilt School of Medicine.

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