Why do some coronavirus patients lose sense of smell? Harvard researchers have an answer – Fox News

According to the Harvard scientists, other viral infections (consisting of coronaviruses) are known to have months-long recovery times for smell. These infections are understood to inflict direct damage to olfactory sensory neurons. In these infections, inflammatory responses can cause changes in smell understanding, though some cases of COVID-19 related anosmia have occurred without nasal swelling.

” I think its excellent news because as soon as the infection clears, olfactory nerve cells do not appear to require to be replaced or rebuilt from scratch,” Datta stated. “But we need more data and a much better understanding of the hidden mechanisms to confirm this conclusion.”.
A different, unassociated research study found that nearly 90 percent of a given subset of coronavirus clients saw improvement in odor over four weeks. Scientist examined 202 mildly symptomatic adults at Treviso Regional Hospital in Italy. At 4 weeks, 89 percent of clients who reported an abrupt beginning of altered sense of smell or taste saw a complete resolution or improvement of the symptoms.

Scientists state olfactory support cells, not nerve cells, are vulnerable to SARS-CoV-2 infection. (iStock).

This finding implies that infection is unlikely to trigger lasting damage and persistent loss of smell.

The research team led by neuroscientists at Harvard Medical School (HMS) found that non-neuronal cell types may be accountable for loss of smell in coronavirus clients. Their findings were recently published in Science Advances.
” Our findings indicate that the unique coronavirus changes the sense of odor in clients not by directly infecting neurons but by affecting the function of supporting cells,” stated Sandeep Robert Datta, senior research study author and associate professor of neurobiology in the Blavatnik Institute at HMS, in a university press release.
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According to the Harvard researchers, other viral infections (including coronaviruses) are known to have months-long healing times for odor. These infections are understood to inflict direct damage to olfactory sensory neurons.

At 4 weeks, 89 percent of patients who reported a sudden onset of transformed sense of smell or taste saw a total resolution or improvement of the signs.

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Short-lived loss of odor, or anosmia, is a common sign of COVID-19, and one research study just recently determined the cell enters the upper nasal cavity most vulnerable to SARS-CoV-2 infection.